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Welcome

Is history, as Henry Ford once claimed, bunk? Is it, as Voltaire allegedly claimed, a pack of tricks we play on the dead? Or is history much more? "The great force of history comes from the fact that we carry it within us," James Baldwin once wrote, "are unconsciously controlled by it in many ways, and history is literally present in all that we do. It could scarcely be otherwise, since it is to history that we owe our frames of reference, our identities, and our aspirations." History is a way to summon the dead, tell their story and think critically of their, and by extension our world. But it is much more than that. It is a craft, a guide, a different way of thinking, a skill to analyze and criticize the world around us. 

My name is Dillon Carroll, I am a historian of American history particularly fascinated by the American Civil War Era. I've written about Confederate soldiers and masculinity, Civil War amputees and disability, Civil War trauma and the coping mechanisms of soldiers, opioid addiction among Civil War veterans, Civil War veterans in New York City, and Civil War Soldiers Wet Dreams. My current book project focuses on mental illness and Civil War veterans in the Gilded Age. I've taught American and European history surveys, the History of Medicine, the History of Women in the U.S., the History of Sexuality and the History of the American Civil War and Reconstruction. I received my PhD in History from the University of Georgia in 2016. I currently live and work in New York City.

In my blog you can find posts about my current and future research projects, such as snippets from my upcoming book project on the mental health of Civil War veterans. You can also find occasional rants about current events from a historical perspective. In my projects section you can find out what I'm currently working on, and what I plan to work on in the future. In my teaching section, you can find syllabi of courses that I've taught, my pedagogical theories, and my musings about teaching history and the profession. Finally, you can find find ways to contact me as well.